Category: Rock

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  1. Live In Tokyo (CD) Mark Farina Mushroom Jazz Volume 5 (CD) Mark Farina Live At Om (CD) Mark Farina Mushroom Jazz 4 (CD) Mark Farina Job Satisfaction (Phil Weeks Mix) Blakkat, Phil Weeks Crazy Party. Leon Louder
  2. Review: Phil Week's ever reliable Robsoul does it again with a third sampler that proves the long running label still has plenty to say for gispunopgezabonlajanzworlturotve.xyzinfo boss himself opens up with "The Devil Wears Prada", a loopy, disco infused house jam filled with warmth and soul. The legendary Mark Farina then links with Homero Espinosa for the wonky loops of "Detour Jazz", then "Golden Ratio" is a.
  3. Review: Bay Area buddies Homero Espinosa and Mark Farina are old studio buddies, producing a string of collaborative singles for Moulton Music. Here, they recuit the services of smooth vocalist Ori Kawa and pitch up on Classic. "It's All Right" effortlessly combines the duo's usual hazy, soul-flecked deepness with the jazz-fired rhythmic swing and low-end bump more often associated with.
  4. May 15,  · Job Satisfaction (Phil Weeks Mix) Artist Blakkat; Album Live In Tokyo; Licensed to YouTube by INgrooves, WMG (on behalf of Om), and 1 Music Rights Societies Mark Farina LIve .
  5. Download Live In Tokyo (unmixed tracks) by Mark Farina/Various at Juno Download. Listen to this and millions more tracks online. Live In Tokyo (unmixed tracks) GENRES. All Genres Balearic/Downtempo Bass Breakbeat Disco/Nu-Disco DJ Tools Drum And Bass Dubstep Deep Dubstep Dirty Dubstep/Trap/Grime EDM Electro Euro Dance/Pop Dance Footwork/Juke.
  6. "Mixes are time capsules of sound. Each capturing a moment in time that will not be repeated the same way. Each mix is meant to transport the listener in their own time machine to their own destinat. San Francisco. 88 Tracks. Followers. Stream Tracks and Playlists from Mark Farina on your desktop or mobile device.
  7. Mark Farina was born on 25 March in Chicago, Illinois, and developed an interest in house music in when he met Derrick Carter at a record store. He started to experiment with songs that weren’t being played in the underground clubs, such as De La Soul and disco classics, while also playing with the “purist forms” of house music.